Are You A Republican Or A Democrat?

debate In 2015, you'll find articles, books, videos, links, and news feeds representing both parties here. So, if you are undecided, this page can help you make up your mind. And if you are a seasoned voter, you can help represent your party's views by participating in the polls and expressing why you chose your party.

debatesIn 2015, you’ll find articles, books, videos, links, and news feeds representing both parties here. So, if you are undecided, this page can help you make up your mind. And if you are a seasoned voter, you can help represent your party’s views by participating in the polls and expressing why you chose your party. There are several articles, duels, and video clips of people sharing their reasons for being a Republican or a Democrat, some of which I ask for your opinion, starting with the 2008 Presidential Election.

First, the Republican viewpoint is represented. The Democrat viewpoint begins after the Regarding Race video. Near the bottom is a guest book where most leave comments about what they thought about how I did on putting together the site, and share random thoughts on politics. Please stay on topic when asked a question. And please give both parties equal time. In some instances, I could not find an equally intelligent or truthful resource that represents both parties. Also, where half-truths or non-truths were stated as fact, commentary was added to eliminate the promotion of false information. This page was not originally intended to be a biased source of information. But you’ll see that I have been accused of that. If being biased means that I am decided and sticking with my convictions, then I am.

A Helpful Hint:

Although neither is perfect, one party is always going to be more consistent with the truth than the other. After all, if they take opposite views on what is best for this country, they can’t both be right. Only one of them is the better solution for America, and we must understand why. We need to know all of the facts (not just the appealing ones), all of the history (not just what supports our argument), what works, what doesn’t… and we all have an opinion, including myself. It is up to you to decide for yourself which party best represents what kind of a country you and your family wish to live in. I am not responsible for what you do with the information I share with you, the decisions you make as a voter (a grown-up), or your own personal biases.

obamaI have been accused of pushing or “forcing” my views on others. Is that possible? Unless you are a child or just extremely gullible for an adult, the answer is no. I may be able to persuade you or plant a thought in your brain for you to mull over, but it is yours to accept or reject. I cannot force you to think the way that I do. In fact, we all know that both adults and children, at any age, are quite the experts at resisting what others say. Furthermore, many people are great talkers, but few are great listeners.

As for me, well, I’m not any different. I interrupt others and bite my tongue when I have something to say but have to wait for it, for fear I will forget before they are finished. But also, like a lot of my closest personal friends, I cannot betray my convictions by promoting ideas that I think are bad for us. I cannot advertise what I loathe, not even for money. I mean, I would make a horrible salesperson for lima beans or canned spinach. But what I can do here is give every civil voice a chance for expression, whether or not I agree with it. And as long as it is clean, sincere, is not too outdated, and is NOT a sales pitch for some pointless conspiracy theory, your comments will remain for all to see.

Voters (and future voters), please be aware that every vote you cast — at all times — matters a great deal to many people in this country. The state of our nation, our daily lives, and the poll results below are indications that not only have some things gone very right throughout history, but occasionally, things went very wrong and have had a nationwide — sometimes global — impact. One example is the recent economic crash. Most of us personally know someone who has lost their home or job, or has been out of work for a very long time. Some of us are those people. Many, including myself, have since concluded that we are fed up with politics. That word — politics — seems to be more and more synonymous with deceit. But that doesn’t mean it is time to quit voting. My personal conclusion is that people simply did not do their research and did not have enough information about the candidates or the issues before casting their votes. We were duped by the biases of the paid-for commercials and journalists who seem to be highly motivated (whether by money, social status, ratings or a combination of those, I’m not sure) to side with a certain party or opinion, even if it is not in our best interest as a nation.

So, do your homework. Use good judgment and common sense. That is why this lens was created. I’ve done some of it here for you. Some of you work hard and have little time to sit down and study these things out. But it is still up to you to look up a candidate’s voting record to see if what they say matches their voting record, which is the best indicator of how a candidate truly feels about the issues. Politicians lie to get votes sometimes. So, the voting record helps you discover who is tickling your ears to get your vote. All I can do is provide you with links, opinions, history, resources, and some facts to supplement your political education. The rest is up to you.

So, if you haven’t done your research on a candidate, or you just aren’t sure who they really are, please don’t guess or X the first box on the ballot. And don’t choose a candidate based upon their race, gender, the way they dress or their accent, the scars on their face, their presence on stage, their size, looks, charisma, something he/she promised to do. Don’t base your vote on what your friends or family are saying, or what your college professor is telling you. Look up the candidate’s voting record! Find the facts. Find a voter’s guide that lists the candidates’ views on the issues. Know both sides of every issue and how it will affect our future. Find out if other countries have made these choices and whether the results of that decision went well for them or not. And refresh your knowledge of history. Don’t simply believe what you are told.

But, if you don’t have time for all that…

…leave the ballot blank.

Those are the only responsible choices a voter can make at the polls.

Regardless of whether you are undecided, have switched parties, or have been faithful to one party all your life, those who visit here want to know what brought you to this decision. Is there a personal choice that you made about a particular issue? Was there a defining moment in history? Something that happened? Or did something else sway your opinion? You are given an opportunity to answer those questions in the middle of this site.

For those who side with neither of the two political parties, please understand that the two major political parties, Republican and Democrat, are realistically the only two types of votes that count for anything in a presidential election. To side with a third party is to nullify your vote, and if enough people do it, it can split a party in half and cause the worst candidate to win. Therefore, this lens is devoted to defining the differences between two parties… Republicans and Democrats.

The Republican Party – GOP History

“The Republican Party was born in the early 1850’s by anti-slavery activists…”

The Republican Party was born in the early 1850’s by anti-slavery activists and individuals who believed that government should grant western lands to settlers free of charge. The first informal meeting of the party took place in Ripon, Wisconsin, a small town northwest of Milwaukee. The first official Republican meeting took place on July 6th, 1854 in Jackson, Michigan. The name “Republican” was chosen because it alluded to equality and reminded individuals of Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party. At the Jackson convention, the new party adopted a platform and nominated candidates for office in Michigan.

In 1856, the Republicans became a national party when John C. Fremont was nominated for President under the slogan: “Free soil, free labor, free speech, free men, Fremont.” Even though they were considered a “third party” because the Democrats and Whigs represented the two-party system at the time, Fremont received 33% of the vote. Four years later, Abraham Lincoln became the first Republican to win the White House.

“Abraham Lincoln became the first Republican to win the White House.”

The Civil War erupted in 1861 and lasted four grueling years. During the war, against the advice of his cabinet, Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation that freed the slaves. The Republicans of the day worked to pass the Thirteenth Amendment, which outlawed slavery, the Fourteenth, which guaranteed equal protection under the laws, and the Fifteenth, which helped secure voting rights for African-Americans.

“The Republican Party also played a leading role in securing women the right to vote. In 1896, Republicans were the first major party to favor women’s suffrage.”

The Republican Party also played a leading role in securing women the right to vote. In 1896, Republicans were the first major party to favor women’s suffrage. When the 19th Amendment finally was added to the Constitution, 26 of 36 state legislatures that had voted to ratify it were under Republican control. The first woman elected to Congress was a Republican, Jeanette Rankin from Montana in 1917.

Presidents during most of the late nineteenth century and the early part of the twentieth century were Republicans. The White House was in Republican hands under Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Bush. Under the last two, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, the United States became the world’s only superpower, winning the Cold War from the old Soviet Union and releasing millions from Communist oppression.

Republicans have a long and rich history with basic principles: Individuals, not government, can make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.

“Individuals, not government, can make the best decisions; all people are entitled to equal rights; and decisions are best made close to home.”

The symbol of the Republican Party is the elephant. During the mid term elections way back in 1874, Democrats tried to scare voters into thinking President Grant would seek to run for an unprecedented third term. Thomas Nast, a cartoonist for Harper’s Weekly, depicted a Democratic jackass trying to scare a Republican elephant – and both symbols stuck. For a long time Republicans have been known as the “G.O.P.” And party faithfuls thought it meant the “Grand Old Party.” But apparently the original meaning (in 1875) was “gallant old party.” And when automobiles were invented it also came to mean, “get out and push.” That’s still a pretty good slogan for Republicans who depend every campaign year on the hard work of hundreds of thousands of volunteers to get out and vote and push people to support the causes of the Republican Party.

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About Winston Webb
Winston Webb is a managing editor of Agree To Disagree. He has a variety of writing passions and performs complex research to deliver great quality to his readers.